Depleting Body Image:

The Effects of Girl Magazine Types on the Self-pride and Body Image of College-age Women

Effect of Journals on College-Age Females' Body Image

Millions of females every day are bombarded with the media's notion of the " perfect” body system. These impractical images happen to be portrayed in women's publications all over the country. The message staying sent to ladies is that they are generally not pretty or skinny enough. The average American woman can be 5'4” and weighs a hundred and forty pounds, while the average American model is 5'11” and weighs 117 pounds. Every year, magazine businesses spend huge amounts of dollars about diet and exercise adverts to put in all their magazines. Publications sell human body dissatisfaction with their readers through unrealistic images of women, along with dieting and exercise info. Thirty years in the past, Marilyn Monroe, a size 14, got the " ideal” physique and size, but today's standard is a lot smaller. Because the beauty suitable continues to get smaller within our society, body image within American women continue to be plummet. Journals portray and compare joy with staying thin; for that reason some think if they are certainly not thin, they are not cheerful. As with women of all ages, many college-age females are believed to keep unrealistic ideals of body shape and size, ideals that could be both physically and emotionally unhealthy.

Each of our study, dedicated to women who show up at the School of Wisconsin-Madison that are involving the ages of eighteen and twenty-four. We wanted to identify the particular effects the magazine characterization of the " perfect” human body has on college-age women's skin image and self-pride. We hypothesized that this characterization contributes to girls having bad body pictures and self-esteem due to the encouragement of body system shapes and sizes in gossip columns that are impractical for most ladies to attain. Inside our study we all defined body image as the subjective concept of one's looks based on self-observation and the result of others. We all defined self-esteem as good and unfavorable evaluations individuals have of themselves. The purpose of this kind of study was to test the influence of women's health/fitness and beauty/fashion magazines on the woman's notion of her body through several distinctive methods.

The first method used to collect data was a survey implemented to 40 college-age females around the UW-Madison campus. The survey centered on body image, self-esteem and thoughts about publications. The second approach used was an statement, consisting of 4 groups of two college-age girls that were asked to discuss their feelings and attitudes toward a fashion/beauty magazine and a health/fitness magazine. Another method conducted was specific interviews of 4 college-age girls using intensive questions to gain additional information on whether college-age women are influenced by the publication industry's tradition of thinness. The fourth method was a great experiment applying twelve college-age women who were divided into 3 separate groups with every group staying assigned one of three journals: a health/fitness magazine, a beauty/fashion journal or a news magazine. Following reading the magazines, the ladies were given a survey very similar to the one found in method 1. The 4 methods mixed allowed us to address our hypothesis that college-age women have bad body images and self-pride due to the culture of thinness which the magazine industry portrays to ladies. Several types of prior exploration on this topic provided extra context to get study.

Cusumano and Thompson (1997) examine the relative influences of media coverage, awareness of social pressures with regards to appearance and internalization on this socio-culture pressure on skin image, eating interference and self-esteem in " Body Image and body shape values in magazines: Direct exposure, awareness and internalization. ” The college-age women had been surveyed through seven forms for the type of magazines they read, combined with time spent reading each...